Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Us vs the Europeans

The European Union definition of personal information and of privacy is so much more restrictive than ours that it should come as no surprise that the Europeans are not as interested in using massive data suction tools to find terrorists as this government is.

I wish I could say that any of the presidential candidates understood the issues around privacy, in particular digital privacy, but I'm afraid we are going to have to leave that to the Supreme Court.

The FBI director says he was greatly misunderstood, that he's simply interested in being able to read "clear text."  Meanwhile, we learn that there was nothing of interest on the work phone in San Bernardino that caused the FBI to take Apple to court to break the device's encryption and to create software most of us in the business call a "back door."  The FBI however is still hopeful that they might be able to figure out what the terrorists did in time not yet accounted for by checking out their GPS data.  (If they were smart enough to use burner phones, they would have been smart enough to turn off "Location Services," thus turn off GPS.)

I am looking for a leader, perhaps a former government official, to become the clear spokesperson for privacy and in particular for digital privacy.  I don't think that Tim Cook can do this and run his business at the same time.  We need a private sector leader to explain clearly to the American public what is at stake in these skirmishes. 

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