Thursday, April 30, 2015

Bright spots

I read recently that sugar reduces the amount of cortisol your body produces under stress.  It makes perfect sense when you think about it, and before they even ran clinical trials -- but based on the last several weeks, I would say that the world gives us more reason than ever to produce the cortisol.

Whether it is the catastrophic earthquake in Tibet and the loss of both human life, property and cultural heritage...or the devastation in Baltimore, a byproduct of an anger that has been festering for years...or simply personal challenges we all face in our work every day, we need to reduce the cortisol. And there are no easy solutions.

I have found generally that doing what I love evens most other risks (including cortisol) out. I love sharing what I know with others, so being a guest luncheon speaker for the Washington Association of Continuity Planners (ACP) gave me back energy when I spoke on leadership and professionalism.

Earlier this week, I led a panel discussion on "Access, Privacy and Information Risk" for the iSchool's iAffiliates Day, held this year most appropriately at the downtown branch of the Seattle Public Library.  My panelists were high bandwidth and compelling -- Jim Loter, who is the director of IT for the library; Bryce Newell, working on his PhD in the iSchool, who discussed his work with body cameras, public disclosure and Washington State Law; and Aaron Weller, director of privacy and security in the Pacific Northwest for PriceWaterhouseCoopers.  You know that it has gone well by the count of hands in the air to ask questions.

Now I'm getting ready for another kind of thrill -- today's guest speaker in my advanced risk seminar is Mike Howard, Chief of Security at Microsoft.  He's had at least two other professional careers before he arrived at Microsoft, and they play continuously into the work he does globally now.  He is a well-known and respected speaker inside and outside security circles on topics of leadership and policy.

"In the zone."  "Doing what you love."  Both good recipes for cortisol reduction.  Find those bright spots.

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